Open Source Bridge 2017 proposals

Open Source Bridge is accepting proposals for our 2017 conference, which will take place June 20–23 in Portland, OR.

Sort by: Title, Track, Submission date

* Containerized Clustered Postgres

Interested in clustered or sharded PostgreSQL, but daunted by challenges of testing and deployment for multiple PostgreSQL nodes? Container infrastructure tools will make things much easier for you, and we'll show you how.
Practice 2017-03-30 15:30:45 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Courageously Contributing - How OpenStack moves past conflict through patience and persistence.

Contributing code to open source projects can be intimidating. Disagreements happen, and we can find our changes caught in the middle. What can we do about it?
Culture 2017-03-30 15:14:52 +0000
Steve Lewis

* Ansible 101

Wanna use an easy-to-learn automation platform? Of course you do. And I say "automation platform" rather than "configuration management" because Ansible isn't just about configuration.
Practice 2017-03-30 14:53:01 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Kubernetes 101

So you’ve containerized your application, and now you want to deploy it scalably across a cluster. Maybe you’ve looked at Kubernetes but you can’t figure out how to use it. In one short session, we’ll teach you enough to get started.
Practice 2017-03-30 14:47:20 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Making MLIS Classrooms Open Source: Activism, Service Learning, and Building Digital Community Archives

This presentation explores an ongoing project to incorporate digital repository building for community archives within a master's level library and information sciences classroom. The class taught under the pedagogical methods of service learning highlighted (and continues to highlight) the complex relationship between proprietary technology and archival 'best practices.' By reimagining this relationship, students were able to look at how open source tools and technologies better accomplished their desired outcomes to build a small-scale repository for their community partner, one whose narratives and materials were representative of feminist activism in the American South.
Activism 2017-03-30 14:29:20 +0000
Travis Wagner, Elise Lewis

* How To Mentor Humans

I feel passionately that women and epecially minority women in tech need mentors and that those already in tech have a duty to step up for them, even though it means getting out of their comfort zone. How do you mentor minorities? How do you mentor anyone? With kindness and respect.
Culture 2017-03-30 00:04:26 +0000
Letta Raven

* Archetypal Ballers and Ternary Plots - Visualizing NBA Skills for Fun and Profit

Basketball is second only to baseball in its rich variety of detailed data and analysis techniques. This project uses two techniques to reduce this complexity. The first, archetypal analysis, is an unsupervised learning technique that reduces the 18-dimensional box scores to a three-dimensional vector. The second, ternary plots, provides an elegant visualization for comparing players and teams. Using these techniques, I'll review the 2016 - 2017 NBA season.
Theory 2017-03-29 21:44:54 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* TIL There's a Microtonal Synth in My Browser!

Did you know there's a digital sound synthesizer in your browser? There is! It's called the Web Audio API and it's accessible from any JavaScript library or framework. I'll show you how I hacked Web Audio to make microtonal music in the browser.
Hacks 2017-03-29 20:27:46 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* SVG: So Very Good

Icon fonts! CSS-only illustrations! High-resolution GIF animations! Today's web designers still regularly and enthusiastically employ these techniques... yet they're all a better fit for SVG, a powerful vector image format that's already old enough to drive a car.
Theory 2017-03-29 18:10:50 +0000
Tyler Sticka

* What I Learned from My Own Just In Time Compiler

We all know the V8 javascript engine, and modern JVMs, are very fast. But why? Sometimes, its easier to find out by reinventing the wheel than from reading monolithic codebases.
Theory 2017-03-29 17:08:53 +0000
Michael R Fairhurst

* How to load 1m lines of Ruby in 5s

How do you load code faster? Load less of it! I'll talk about how we used static analysis and aggressive refactoring to reduce the time to reload code after a change by 85%.
Hacks 2017-03-29 17:00:35 +0000
Andrew Metcalf

* Serving social spaces

Shared application servers are a vital building block for creating resilient information networks. Recent advances have made them dramatically easier to deploy and maintain in your home/workplace/community. Come for a tour, stay for a deep dive.
Activism 2017-03-29 06:29:46 +0000
Eric Drechsel

* The Business of Open Source (or, how we think about it at CoreOS)

Peter Levine, a partner at Andreessen-Horowitz, famously said Red Hat would be the last successful OSS business. A dire forecast for the multitudes building their business atop of open source today. This talk is will dive into basic economic theory, how we’ve applied it at CoreOS, and ultimately describe what the current and next generation of open source business looks like.
Culture 2017-03-29 03:50:11 +0000
Elsie Phillips, Paul Burt

* #workzoneWTF: crowdsourcing policy change in PDX

Walk or ride your bike around Portland long enough and you'll come across unsafe sidewalk and road closures. To paint a clear picture of this issue, Oregon Walks and The Street Trust (BTA) ran a social media campaign collecting hundreds of photos and videos from citizens using a little tech sauce we whipped up. The pressure was on for City Hall to pass new closure requirements, which they did unanimously. This talk covers the people, the methods, and the open tech used to help move the needle.
Activism 2017-03-29 02:06:41 +0000
Tim Welch

* Habitat Workshop

An awesome workshop showing off how Habitat solves common application deployment and management issues.
Practice 2017-03-28 23:30:43 +0000
Eric Maxwell

* Transform Your Organization Like a Jedi, You Should

Take home some practical Jedi mind-tricks and use them with ease to make your organization more awesome.
Culture 2017-03-28 23:28:03 +0000
Eric Maxwell

* How to Prototype and User Test: A Workshop

Prototype early and test often! Learn how to brainstorm an idea, create a simple paper prototype, and conduct some guerilla user tests.
Practice 2017-03-28 22:27:45 +0000
morgan miller

* Containers: A Guide for the Perplexed

WTF are containers anyway? And what aren't they? And what is all this other ... stuff? Come find out.
Theory 2017-03-28 18:13:31 +0000
Josh Berkus

* Mapbox GL: A modern, robust, open source map renderer on web and mobile

Come learn about the open source Mapbox GL native and web map renderer, how it is designed, the open specs on which it is built, and how to use it in your projects.
Practice 2017-03-28 18:02:52 +0000
Justin Miller

* Keeping Application Support Human

You’ve built it, now you need to keep your users happy. Doing this without sacrificing your own happiness, and those of your teammates, takes planning. The intersection of monitoring and bother-the-humans is central to team happiness. We will go over this intersection and provide ways to navigate this humanely, and make your users happy.
Practice 2017-03-28 14:42:47 +0000
Jamie Riedesel

* Contacts to Connections: CRM funneling for FLOSS projects

As an organization or project grows, it often becomes hard to keep track of the various community members, donors, and volunteers who are connected. The answer to this is the often used sales tool, a contact relationship manager (CRM). Lets look at a non-sales focused tool, CiviCRM and see how it can be combined with Discourse and various Drupal forms to create a contact funnel.
Practice 2017-03-27 21:48:19 +0000
Wm Salt Hale

* IndieWeb 101: owning your content and identity

The IndieWeb strives to create an alternative to content silos and the 'corporate web'. This is achieved through creating a single source of truth for your content and identity aka a personal domain. Let's explore the ramifications of this and answer any questions you might have together!
Activism 2017-03-27 21:45:45 +0000
Wm Salt Hale

* Keepassing your credentials synced and under control

Do you use the same few passwords over and over? Is there a piece of paper with hard-to-remember ones somewhere? How about a file that lives on five different devices and is never up-to-date? Even the most secure passwords can be broken with a $5 wrench. Long forgotten websites are frequently compromised. Files can be stored in The Cloud, but is that really where such sensitive data should be?
Practice 2017-03-27 21:41:52 +0000
Wm Salt Hale

* Making dollars and sense of open source funding's future

Sustainably funding public goods is hard, just ask your local government. We know FLOSS benefits everyone, whether or not users contributed to its development. How then can we reach the world of everyone working on software they love while making a livable wage? We have been working on concept called 'crowdmatching' that creates a network effect through mutual assurance to fund the commons.
Activism 2017-03-27 21:36:43 +0000
Wm Salt Hale

* Hack Harassment: a New Initiative to Enable Communities to Reduce Online Harassment

In this presentation, we will present the methodology used to create a harassment dataset and classifier, the dataset used to help the system learn what harassment looks like, along with a call to action for anyone interested to get involved with the project directly.
Activism 2017-03-27 21:17:25 +0000
George Kennedy

* How Open Source Audiovisual Tools Help Archivists (And You Too!)

This talk will hype several "homemade" open source video tools specific to the audiovisual digital preservation field built on broadly-used existing open source tools such as FFmpeg and mediainfo. We will discuss how these communities have grown to benefit the field of archiving and how we've grown to be able to give back to the main communities.
Practice 2017-03-27 19:25:32 +0000
Ashley Blewer, Andrew Weaver

* Getting to 0.1.0: Build Management for Your Personal Project

There's a lot that goes into a great open-source repository besides the code. How do you make your project easy for a newcomer to understand? What about easy to install, to test, and to contribute to? Big projects have whole teams dedicated to building robust releases, but you're just a solo dev with a dream. Great news! You don't have to put your project on hold to study build engineering. Come learn a few simple tools that will put some professional polish on your personal project.
Practice 2017-03-27 11:23:14 +0000
Finn Ellis

* What is a Bug?: Imagination and Failure in Complex Systems

When working in complex systems, bugs become more than just one-line errors: they become stories and histories, manifestations of time and space. How do you deal with failure - not as an unanticipated event - but as a natural and expected outcome?
Practice 2017-03-26 02:46:10 +0000
Bonnie Eisenman

* WebPush Notifications for Kinto

I'll first talk about what Kinto is, followed by a details of how webpush works. I'll wrap it up by explaining how webpush can be integrated into apps using simple http calls.
Theory 2017-03-24 11:55:15 +0000
Mansimar Kaur

* Seasons of Debian - Summer of Code and Winter of Outreachy

A talk about Google Summer of Code and Outreachy Internship Program with Debian. Discusses Urvika Gola and Pranav Jain’s work with Debian on an open source project for an android ‘Lumicall’ application.
Culture 2017-03-24 03:21:05 +0000
Urvika Gola, Pranav Jain

* Applied Abstract Problems in FOSS Infrastructure

This talk will focus on some of the mathematical aspects of DevOps demonstrated through the investigation of problems in FOSS Infrastructure.
Theory 2017-03-22 23:59:43 +0000
Daniel Pono Takamori

* The Hardest Problem in Tech(nical Interviewing) is People: The personal skills in interviewing

Technical interviews can be intimidating, but it’s easier if you have confidence in yourself and your ability to answer complicated questions. The hardest questions are not about sorting algorithms, but how you’ll work in a team, how you’ll resolve conflicts, and what it will be like to manage and work with you. This workshop exists to address the skills and theories of presenting yourself as confident, capable, and coachable.
Culture 2017-03-22 21:30:06 +0000
Carol Smith, Heidi Waterhouse

* self.care(): Optimizing Happiness for People In Tech

People in tech are prone to working too much and all the time, for their day jobs and volunteer projects. We work nights, weekends. We neglect family, friends and hobbies. If you want to learn about SELF care and how to practice it continuously, this talk is for you!
Practice 2017-03-22 11:19:06 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* No Coding Skills Required: How to Contribute to Open Source in Other Ways

You always wanted to contribute to Open Source but you don’t know how to code (yet)? Or maybe you can but you simply want to contribute in other ways? The goal of this talk is to explore how you can use your skills and contribute to Open Source in ways that don’t involve writing code.
Practice 2017-03-22 11:16:33 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Threading Yarn, Writing Code: What Traditional Arts and Crafts Can Teach Us About Programming

You’ve probably heard people say that programming is an art and a craft. Does it have anything to do with the traditional arts and crafts like cross stitching, knitting, or sewing? In this talk we’ll explore the intersection of traditional and modern crafts and what they can learn from each other.
Theory 2017-03-22 11:13:56 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Flourishing FLOSS: Making Your Project Successful

You maintain an Open Source project but your project isn’t succeeding in the ways you want? In this talk we’ll explore the different components of an OS project & how they work together. Afterwards you’ll be well-equipped with a ideas & strategies for growing, and nourishing your OS project.
Practice 2017-03-22 11:10:58 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Be(come) a Mentor! Help Others Succeed!

There is always something new to learn in technology. We are always experts in one and beginners in another field. In order to learn successfully it’s important to have a mentor but it’s equally important to learn how to be a good mentor.
Practice 2017-03-22 11:07:03 +0000
Anna Ossowski

* Decoding the history of codes

The word "code" means different things to different people. In this talk, we explore cryptography and how it's evolved over time. We look at some key historical events and see how the art of encryption affected our lives.
Theory 2017-03-22 02:51:15 +0000
Niharika Kohli

* Introduction to Julia Programming

Would you like to learn a new programming language and some basketball analytics? Julia is the latest in a long line of programming languages designed for scientific computing. In Part 1 of this introduction, I'll go over the basic concepts of scientific computing and Julia. In Part 2, I'll show you how to apply these concepts and Julia to basketball analytics, using data freely available on the web.
Practice 2017-03-21 01:31:36 +0000
M Edward Borasky

* Become a Rocket Scientist With Open Source

The new space industry is expanding rapidly, with huge opportunities for open-source contributions. This talk focuses on the case study of Asterank, software that makes space data easier to access and explore. Its analysis and visualization tools have been used in government, private industry, and schools. The project has made public space data more open and usable for millions of people.
Hacks 2017-03-17 19:14:05 +0000
Ian Webster

* Advanced filtering on your API endpoints with SQLAlchemy and FIQL

How robust is the filtering of your API? Let's delve into how a string of text can become a set of instructions to the API on exactly what records should be returned.
Practice 2017-03-15 17:08:07 +0000
Serge Domkowski

* Working around AWS Lambda's limits with Ansible

This talk would explain how we used Ansible's master-slave provisioning orchestration to work around AWS Lambda's limits.
Hacks 2017-03-13 12:28:28 +0000
Jalem Raj Raj Rohit

* Voting-Method-Reform Activism

Activists around the world are experimenting with using voting to coordinate their decisions, and it's obvious that secure, open-source software must handle this form of communication. Yet typically such software is developed without involving "voting architects" who understand the math behind fair and unfair voting methods. Let's bridge this gap. Together we can build surveys and decentralized collaboration systems that bring democracy to very high levels of fairness, especially compared to the intentionally unfair use of single-mark ballots in governmental elections.
Activism 2017-03-13 06:20:31 +0000
Richard Fobes

* Real Life Experiences Balancing a Viable Vendor Eco-system with Open Source Community

Experiences balancing Open Source Community and a viable vendor/consultancy model to promote a sustainable eco-system.
Culture 2017-03-10 05:18:19 +0000
Tony McCormick

* From the mouth of a child: A young hacker’s perspective on Open Source culture

I've been around Open Source my entire life. As a young FOSS dev, I've grown up looking at the community from the perspective that this is "my people". This talk looks at some of what I can definitively say are victories, a retrospective of two decades of lessons learned, and finally some challenges our community faces.
Culture 2017-03-10 01:42:02 +0000
Morgan Gangwere

* How I Went From Newbie to Open Source Project Owner

This is the story of how focusing first on building a community of individuals who care about mentoring has allowed me to turn the idea of mentor matching for people learning to code into a multi-platform open source project.
Culture 2017-03-09 14:20:14 +0000
Kim Crayton

* #pdxtech The Shadow World of Portland tech

A panel of #pdxtech irc community members giving their take on the Portland tech scene
Culture 2017-03-07 22:29:05 +0000
Tyler Gillies

* Unionizing Tech: Everybody needs a union

The Open Source Movement has a few defining traits, such as the the do-it-yourself, stick-it-to-the-man scrappiness; the caring about the people around us and their experience with the software or workplace; and, the way it is forever adaptable to the needs of the situation. Open source and unions have a lot in common - lets get started unionizing open source shops!
Culture 2017-03-07 20:49:59 +0000
Sam Scott

* Read, Write, Talk, Sing, Play: What Early Literacy Can Teach Us About Software Literacy

I'm not saying that you have to speak parentese to beginning software learners. They might be quite offended with you doing that, actually. What beginners often need, though, is not just to be set in front of a tutorial and told to come back when they're finished, but to have someone on hand to bounce questions off of or to talk them through problems and exercises so that they understand. Learners often pick up useful information by observing someone else at work using the language, but they can't just be there while you do things and learn it all by observation alone. One of the best skills a librarian has that goes mostly unnoticed is that they're really great at narrating themselves to others. When demonstrating (sometimes for the sixteenth time) how to go through a procedure to obtain resources or run searches, librarians narrate what they are doing and why. When reading a book to tiny people, youth services librarians often ask questions about what the characters are doing or feeling, so that the tiny people can use both the text and the pictures to decode what's going on in the story. Key information about the story is often communicated visually in a picture book, and sometimes in complete contradiction to the text. By providing scaffolding through narration, the librarian provides context and reasoning for the actions they're taking. By asking questions at regular intervals, the librarian can check to make sure understanding is happening and adjust to include perspectives they may not have been taking into account before. [...] Talking and explaining things to your learners, and with each other, is the best way to help them learn. So if you get the opportunity to have someone shadow you and ask you annoying questions about what you're doing and why you're doing it that way, take up the opportunity. (And request it all gets documented. Trust me.) By talking through things with someone who doesn't have your expertise, you shore up your own knowledge and help someone get more of their own. That leads to literacy.
Culture 2017-03-07 20:14:58 +0000
Alex Byrne

* Edge Case Too: The Intersections of Identity

A thing that human brains do is generalize groups based on the individuals that they personally know who make up that group, either as examples of the group or as exceptions to the group. Thus, you get both #YesAllWomen and #NotAllMen. The easy way to beat this human tendency is to surround yourself with more than one person of that given identity or group membership....More likely than not, there's going to be one, maybe two, people in your immediate work circle who are part of groups that you're interested in recruiting more of into your profession or project. Usually. As we pointed out above, in some cases, you have one in your entire department who carry the entirety of their group identity with them wherever they may be going, without anyone else to be able to share the burden of being everyone's shortcut example of how that group behaves.
Culture 2017-03-07 20:00:12 +0000
Alex Byrne

* A Community-Driven Future for Open Data Kit (ODK)

Open Data Kit (ODK) replaces paper surveys with smartphones. ODK tools are open-source and are primarily used by social good organizations to collect data quickly, accurately, offline, and at scale. ODK has been used to collect billions of data points around the world. In this talk, Yaw Anokwa and Hélène Martin, two of the leaders of the ODK community discuss the problems that inspired ODK’s design, demonstrate the impact the tools are having, and describe how the Open Source Bridge community can contribute to an open-source, community-driven future for mobile data collection tools.
Activism 2017-03-07 18:37:38 +0000
Yaw Anokwa, Hélène Martin

* The Existential Tester: How to Assess Risk and Prioritize Tests

To test, or not to test? That is the question. With limited time and resources there are only so many tests we can write and run. How do you determine what features of a new project to test? How do you know when a test is obsolete, or needs to be updated? What gets run per-commit, nightly, or weekly? What should you test manually? This talk will give you a framework for thinking about how to assess risk on a project and prioritize your
Theory 2017-03-07 17:45:24 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* How Can I Contribute?

This talk is for you, the documentarian, developer, student, or community member wondering what you can contribute to open source and how to get started. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you're contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request.
Culture 2017-03-07 17:36:49 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* Refocus: The One Stop Shop For Monitoring System Health

In this talk we will share why we decided create Refocus: our internally developed, self-service tool for monitoring computing systems. We’ll cover how it is extensible, describe its tech stack of open source components including Node.js, how it differs from other monitoring tools on the market, and how data is modeled in Refocus.
Practice 2017-03-06 18:48:13 +0000
anny he

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture 2017-03-01 05:34:52 +0000
Carol Smith