Richard Fobes's favorites

Open Source Bridge 2017

Favorite sessions for this user

* Falsehoods Programmers Believe About (Human) Languages - Common pitfalls in interface translation

Making open source software translatable is easy, right? You just take out all the strings, put them in a translation file in your git repository, and start accepting pull requests. Simple! Well, not so fast. There’s a lot more to this than meets the eye, and if you take a quick and dirty approach you’ll end up with upset translators, complaints from users, and mysteries like “what is ١٢٬٣٤٥٬٦٧٨ and why does my code want to parse that as a number?”. Thankfully, there are open source resources and libraries that can take care of these things for you.
Practice
Roan Kattouw

* Grassroots activism is hard. Can open source help?

Grassroots activists have to deal with many challenges - including the tools they’re using. Sounds like a great opportunity for open source! This session will survey progressive and transpartisan grassroots activists’ needs and today’s solutions (including techniques that work for explicitly intersectional groups), look at some existing open-source offerings and how they could evolve to better meet grassroots activists’ needs, and identify future directions that could be even more impactful.
Activism
Jon Pincus

* Keeping Secrets On Remote Machines

Conventional wisdom says that using the cloud means giving up privacy and control. But maybe crypto is actually literally magic and we can have our cake and eat it too? We're mostly not there yet, but let's talk about some of the ways that we're getting close.
Theory
Erica Portnoy

* Learn the lambda calculus and be a better programmer

Come learn an ancient model of pen & paper programming in order to change how you think about code
Theory
Clarissa Littler

* The Hardest Problem in Tech(nical Interviewing) is People: The personal skills in interviewing

Technical interviews can be intimidating, but it’s easier if you have confidence in yourself and your ability to answer complicated questions. The hardest questions are not about sorting algorithms, but how you’ll work in a team, how you’ll resolve conflicts, and what it will be like to manage and work with you. This workshop exists to address the skills and theories of presenting yourself as confident, capable, and coachable.
Culture
Carol Smith, Heidi Waterhouse

* The Set of Programmers: How Math Restricts Us

People new to programming often have to work through barriers of language and learning in order to become proficient and being contributing. Does one of those barriers need to be one's math skills? Most schools and textbooks seem to think so. Let's discuss how we're introducing new developers to programming and whether we can make it more inclusive by removing the mathematics and replacing it with logic.
Culture
Carol Smith

* Want to own Twitter? The burgeoning Platform Cooperativism movement and what it means for you.

They have started up democratic copies of major platforms. They are building ways to better collaborate using the internet. They’re even talking about citizens buying out and protecting important internet communities like Twitter. Who are these people? They are Platform Cooperativists.
Activism
Taylor McLeod

Favorite proposals for this user

* The Space Between Teams

It starts small--a manageable codebase, a tight-knit team, everyone headed the same direction. But with success comes growth, and soon it’s hard to keep track of all those teams. Problems emerge in the gaps between what one team provides and another expects. Let’s look at how New Relic has faced these growing pains.
Practice 2017-03-31 17:28:37 +0000
Jason Clark

* Voting-Method-Reform Activism

Activists around the world are experimenting with using voting to coordinate their decisions, and it's obvious that secure, open-source software must handle this form of communication. Yet typically such software is developed without involving "voting architects" who understand the math behind fair and unfair voting methods. Let's bridge this gap. Together we can build surveys and decentralized collaboration systems that bring democracy to very high levels of fairness, especially compared to the intentionally unfair use of single-mark ballots in governmental elections.
Activism 2017-03-13 06:20:31 +0000
Richard Fobes

Open Source Bridge 2014

Favorite sessions for this user

* Badging and Beyond: Rubrics and Building a Culture of Recognition as Community Building Strategies

What are the qualities you need more of in your open source community?
Culture
Larissa Shapiro

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Data Wrangling: Getting Started Working with Data for Visualizations

Good data visualization allows us to leverage the incredible pattern-recognition abilities of the human brain to answer questions we care about. But how do you make a good visualization? Here's a crash course.
Cooking
Rachel Shadoan

* Data, Privacy, & Trust in Open Source: 10 Lessons from Wikipedia

Few people today are not concerned with the way data is used to enhance or subvert individual privacy. This is especially true on the Web, where open source technologies are behind much of what we interact with and use on a daily basis. As the most fundamental aspects of our lives become networked -- social relationships, work, finance, and even how we get our food -- how can we make sure that open source technologies foster a sense of trust with users, protect their privacy, and still give data scientists the tools they need to gain insight?
Culture
Steven Walling

* Distributed Agile Development or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Remoties

This is the story of how the mobile web engineering team at the Wikimedia Foundation became an extremely high-functioning and successful agile team: by embracing - rather than shying away from - a distributed model. This talk will explore the agile team's journey and how we cope with the inherent tension of remoteness and the agile principle, 'The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation'.
Culture
Arthur Richards

* Freedom, security and the cloud

Cloud hosting is cheap. Cloud hosting is easy. What compromises are you making when you deploy to the cloud, both in terms of your security and in terms of your dependency on proprietary software?
Chemistry
Matthew Garrett

* OAuth, IndieAuth, and the Future of Authorization APIs

You use OAuth every time you log in to Facebook or Twitter, but what if you could use it from your own website? What if your own domain became a source of data, and you had your own personal API? By decentralizing authorization to your own domain instead of a silo, you control when, how, and to whom your data is shared.
Chemistry
Aaron Parecki

* OpenStreetWhat? Mapping The World With Open Data

Come learn about OpenStreetMap, a Wikipedia-like project with over one million contributors aiming to map the entire world. We'll talk about the project, the data, and how to do some cool things with it.
Cooking
Justin Miller, Rafa Gutierrez

* The Outreach Program for Women: what works & what's next

We've mentored and interned in the Outreach Program for Women, and we know it works -- it improves the gender balance inside open source communities. We'll discuss why it works, how it builds off of Google Summer of Code, and discuss replicating it, expanding it, and looking at the next step in the recruiting and inclusion pipeline.
Cooking
Sumana Harihareswara, Liz Henry

* Unicode Beyond Just Characters: Localization with the CLDR

Unicode is much more than just characters. The Unicode Consortium defines open standards for collating, parsing, and formatting data in much of the world’s languages. The Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) is the largest standard repository of locale data along with specifications for its use and is a powerful resource for software localization.
Cooking
Nova Patch

* xmonad: the window manager that (practically) reads your mind

Many desktop environments try to be easy to use for the average user, but that's not you. You're at your computer all day writing code; you don't have time to waste _dragging windows_ (ugh!) or watching _animated transitions_ (yuck!). David Brewer will demonstrate how by using xmonad, a tiling window manager, you can bend your desktop to your will and control your windows with telepathy. Kind of.
Cooking
David Brewer

Favorite proposals for this user

* Fix Code, Delete Docs

Educators, authors, and co-workers are constantly demanding more code comments and documentation, yet none of them ever update it. The comments lie, the documentation exists in three variants, and still nobody knows how to make the code do the right thing.
Chemistry 2014-04-04 08:03:19 +0000
Eric Wilhelm

* Graph Visualization on the Web

GraphAlchemist is open-sourcing `Alchemy.js` its core graph visualization technology built largely in d3.js. Graph visualization is an incredible way to represent just about any time of 'connected data' - social networks, supply chains, telecommunications networks, protein interactions, and even biological family trees. Alchemy.js makes it easier for anyone to create data visualizations that represent these types of data - without being a data visualization expert.
Cooking 2014-04-03 18:10:40 +0000
Huston Hedinger

* How "Open" Changes Product Development

There's a lot of speculation about open source product development. How can a product with "no IP" be competitive? What are the viable business models, when the code is freely available? And how am I supposed to build and take a viable product to market if my company is focused on services, not products? The truth is, you can build -- and successfully take to market -- an open source product. But the rules are different, and must not be ignored.
Business 2014-04-11 23:56:43 +0000
Karen Borchert

* Rating, ranking, and voting, the other social-media communication method

A parallel universe exists alongside text-based social media. Product ratings and customer-feedback surveys and organizational elections provide another path through which people communicate. Yet when we look at product ratings and survey results and election outcomes, do they always provide meaningful information? No. What tricks can we use to "outvote" other voters? Most importantly, how should your website or app or organization do the counting behind rating and ranking and voting? Alas, innovative DIY approaches easily give disastrous results. Only open-source software can produce trustworthy results. And only an understanding of counting methods can empower us to produce meaningful results.
Chemistry 2014-03-29 19:02:05 +0000
Richard Fobes

* Rethinking the Single Page Web Application

We were promised a glorious future with RESTful APIs, clients with lighting fast JavaScript engines, and an end to sending UI from the server. Now your project is late, the technical debt is piling up, and you're thinking that hey, Rails wasn't awful. Let's talk about when it's a good idea to build a single page, client side app, and when it's not. I'll be drawing from my experience building a single-app to manage an enterprise software as a service product. Before you jumped into Backbone, Ember, or Angular, you needed to think through the APIs you have, and still had to build. You need to look at the interactions in your UI. You need to figure out where and how your users will access the application.
Cooking 2014-04-11 08:57:43 +0000
Bill Humphries